Charlie’s & downtown Chicago

The weather was nice this past Friday, so I flew from JVL to 1C5 and had lunch at Charlie’s on the airport with a coworker. After lunch we jumped in the Arrow and flew south of MDW to the shoreline and up to the Navy Pier and then back to Clow.




Jim M.
PA-28R-200
Based at BUU
ATC Chicago TRACON

Comments

  • Hi Jim,
    Great photos and flight. :) Back in 1977 I lost a Grumman TR-2 (AA1) at clow. Plane totalled, thankfully I wasn't in it.

    Scott Sherer
    Wright Brothers Master Pilot, FAA Commercial Pilot
    Aviation Director, Piper Owner Society Forum Moderator and Pipers Author.

    Need help? Let me know!

  • Ouch! Sorry about the plane; glad you weren’t part of it. Now I’ll always have something to think about whenever I fly into there.... :D

    Jim M.
    PA-28R-200
    Based at BUU
    ATC Chicago TRACON

  • Me too. A flight instructor ran it out of gas on takoff at Clow and flew into an apartment building. I was about 22 at the time, I think. First plane. I was selling it to get a Grumman Cheetah.

    Here's a picture of it and of me flying it to Key West about 1976 or so.

    Scott Sherer
    Wright Brothers Master Pilot, FAA Commercial Pilot
    Aviation Director, Piper Owner Society Forum Moderator and Pipers Author.

    Need help? Let me know!

  • Oh wow! You look great for 7 years before I was born, Scott! :D

    How much of a hurry are you in when you run out of gas on takeoff?? I was surprised at the big blue house at the approach end of runway 36. It would take balls of steel to live in that house!

    In college, a friend of mine (now a 767 pilot) and I flew his AA1 from Bismarck, ND to Fargo. He owned the plane and I was getting a free BFR (he was a CFI) in exchange for driving from Grand Forks to Bismarck (my girlfriend at the time got a raw deal....she had to drive both ways).

    After takeoff, we were messing around. The canopy was partially open, and I did the “zero G” maneuver and almost launched him out of the plane. His seatbelt wasn’t latched and he caught himself, thankfully, before departing out of the top of the airplane.

    On the same flight, we ended up on top of a cloud deck. I didn’t think anything of it; we were both instrument rated commercial pilots. He forgot his approach plates, and I didn’t have mine because I was just going to be riding along and doing some VFR maneuvers. No big deal, because he had the ILS into FAR memorized. When we got there, the ILS was out of service, so we would have to do the VOR approach. Then the radio and LORAN started acting goofy. We realized the alternator had quit and the battery was running out of juice.

    We flew north toward GFK and found a hole in the clouds and descended through them. We turned off the battery master to save electrons, and then turned the battery back on once we got close to Fargo. The tower gave the landing clearance and taxi instructions knowing we might lose the radio along the way.

    He landed and it turns out, the alternator was disconnected during the annual, but never got reconnected.

    Needless to say, I learned a heck of a lot on that flight.

    Jim M.
    PA-28R-200
    Based at BUU
    ATC Chicago TRACON

  • But for the grace of god go we. :)

    Scott Sherer
    Wright Brothers Master Pilot, FAA Commercial Pilot
    Aviation Director, Piper Owner Society Forum Moderator and Pipers Author.

    Need help? Let me know!

  • Jim,
    Great pix. Nice shots of Soldier Field, Field Museum and the hopefully soon to be returned to flight status Northerly Island.

  • Jim,
    BTW, next time you see Bruce Chien, tell him I said Hi.

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